United Kingdom

Top 10 Things

  • What NOT to do
  • What to do
  • In the UK, if you are driving here and trying to overtake someone on the road, always overtake from the right not from the left (which is called undertake). It's illegal to undertake in the UK with only exception when the right lane is even slower than your lane. --CCP_UK
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  • If people are standing in line, waiting, do not try to go in front of them, this is will cause offence. --Rick
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  • Do not call the whole of The UK, England. The UK consists of 4 countries, England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, calling the latter 3, England or calling the locals English is be sure to raise some eyebrows. --Rick
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  • Do not speak too loudly in public places, you will find most British people will speak fairly quietly and try to keep the conversation between themselves, speaking too loudly in certain places will annoy some locals for sure. --Rick
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  • Do not block people on Escalators, always stand to the right side, so people can go past you. --Rick
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  • Don't ask for a rest room when you need to relieve yourself. A rest room is somewhere where you sit or lie. Ask for a toilet or lavatory. --h.gaffing@outlook.com
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  • As a female wedding guest, do not wear a white outfit. This is the traditional colour of the bride's dress and it suggests you are attempting to outdo her. --Mandy1
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  • Never spit in the street; it is dirty and unhygienic. It may be acceptable in some parts of the world, but in UK you will be considered uncouth and offensive to other users of the street. --Mandy1
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  • When eating at a dinner table, do not have your elbows on the table, do not eat with your mouth open, do not wear a hat at the table, and most definitely, do not burp. These are considered basic etiquette in The UK. --Rick
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  • We all use our Smart phones ('cell' in America) and they can be quite addictive. Nevertheless, do not scroll through your socials or check your email when having a face to face conversation. This disrespects what the other person is saying and suggests you are being rude to them. --Mandy1
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  • I find that transport in the UK is pretty good. Make use of travel cards where possible as this reduces costs, this is also depending on short visits or relocating. Timetables are online for most journeys whether it be, bus, train or boat. --Leew
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  • When driving on pretty, winding rural roads and appreciating the scenery in Scotland be aware that those following you are going about their everyday business so pull into a lay-by at the earliest opportunity to let them overtake. On single track roads this is a much appreciated courtesy. --Stuart
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  • On escalators on the Underground, stand on the right, and leave the left side free for people in a hurry who want to get up or down more quickly. --Trog
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  • An old tradition, originating in the days of the horse and cart, is that a man, walking in the street with a lady, should position himself between her and the road. It was thought unacceptable for a lady to be splashed with mud. Observing this custom is still seen as the mark of a gentleman. --Mandy1
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  • Be sure to take your manners to The UK, if someone is in your way, politely say, ''excuse me'', If you bump into someone by accident, say ''sorry'' and always try to say thank you, when appropriate. --Rick
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  • The lunch, dinner or party that follows a wedding ceremony is called a 'reception'. On leaving the reception you should thank the bride's parents, who are probably footing the bill for a lavish celebration. Unless, of course, you know someone else (these days, often the bride and groom) is paying. --Mandy1
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  • If attending a wedding in church or a registry office, it is customary for the bride's friends to sit on the same side of the room as her family; and for the groom's friends to sit on the same side as his family. --Mandy1
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  • On public transport, stand away from the doors and allow people to get off before you try to get on. You'll be frowned at if you try to push past people getting off. --Trog
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  • If you are invited to attend a wedding, which is usually done via a formal, printed invitation, you will be asked to 'RSVP'. This means please reply. As the organisers need to know how many to cater for, it is considered very rude if you don't reply as to whether you will or will not attend. --Mandy1
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  • If you are walking out of a door, and notice someone is right behind you, hold it open for them to be respectful. --Rick
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Top contributor: Mandy1 (12 entries)

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