Japan

Top 10 Things

  • What NOT to do
  • What to do
  • Don't stand your chopsticks up in your rice like you're a matador. Don't stick them up and leave them there. Leave that for funerals. :) --Rad
    7 0
  • Do not be happy and talk on a bus. Do not listen to earphones if even the slightest sound can be heard by others. No talking on cell phones. Do not think those around you are reasonable people. --Rad
    7 2
  • Do not pass any food or anything to anyone, from your chopsticks to theirs, ever. The only appropriate situation is after the body is cremated and you're passing a bone. Someone will tell you which one and when. --Rad
    3 0
  • In Italy, people say "chin chin" for "cheers" when drinking. Don't say this in Japan, as it means "penis". --Koos83
    3 0
  • Do not drive aggressively in Japan. People are not aggressive drivers, and generally very orderly -- so plan on following the rules and being courteous. --Zoolander
    3 1
  • Don't put sugar in your green tea. It's like putting sugar in diet coke: it may actually taste okay, but it's considered strange and gross. --Zoolander
    2 0
  • Don't be too direct with your opinions. Even just saying "This is a good idea, but..." and then trailing off, will let them know you really don't like the idea. --Koos83
    2 0
  • It's common for Japanese people to give gifts and say they're not good when they visit you. Don't believe it or be offended. Ex.: I'm a bad cook, and I didn't have any of the proper ingredients when I threw this together; this is for you. --Rad
    1 0
  • Do not eat while walking, it is generally frowned upon. Sit down at a restaurant to eat. --Zoolander
    2 1
  • When in public, do not talk loudly, whether in person or on the phone. --Zoolander
    1 0
  • Slurp your noodles when you eat, it shows that you like it --Zee
    4 0
  • When you take someone's business card, look at it, and treat it with respect, it represents them. --Nihonjin
    3 0
  • Upon receiving your meal from the server (or even in someone’s home) it’s polite to say “itadakimasu” which is similar to *saying grace* or being thankful for the food. --sheisiconic
    3 0
  • When you enter someone's house, always say "Shitsurei shimasu" or "Ojama shimasu". It literally means "I'm being rude" but it's just a way to acknowledge that you're imposing on their time and space. --Koos83
    2 0
  • Take your shoes off when you go into a house, with the shoes facing outside. --Nihonjin
    2 0
  • Japanese love food as gifts, so if you can bring something from your hometown or home country, they will appreciate it. Wrap it with care: they will notice the quality of wrapping. --Zoolander
    2 0
  • It is very important in Japan to queue correctly and orderly for trains. Pay attention to where you are standing, make sure you are in the correct queue. --Zoolander
    2 0
  • When you receive a gift from someone, custom is to give them back a gift later that's about half the value of the gift you received. --Koos83
    2 0
  • When you flush the toilet, and the faucet on the top of the toilet runs with water, you can wash your hands there. This is a Japanese way of conserving water and being efficient. --Zoolander
    1 0
  • Get a Suica from the ticket office, and then recharge it. You can use this for all forms of public transportation, and all train lines. --Zoolander
    1 0

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Top contributor: Zoolander (18 entries)

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