Nigeria

Top 10 Things

  • What NOT to do
  • What to do
  • In Nigeria, never accept anything with your left hand.eg items bought, handshakes --Tobo
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  • Don’t enter a house or place with the inscription “Ba shiga” which simply means “No entry” without the permission of the owner of the house. Such inscriptions are common in Northern Nigeria. --Phransix
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  • In Eastern Nigeria (Igbo), it is a taboo for a widow to make any journey that involves sleep overs during her mourning period - usually within six months of her loss. It is believed that once she passes the night somewhere else outside her home, her husband's spirit would kill her. --Assumpta
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  • Don’t outrightly reject food from the locals , it could be interpreted as not liking them. Even if you won’t eat, allow them to serve you and make an effort to taste the food with gladness. --Phransix
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  • In Nigeria, once you've paid for an item you purchased (mostly cash payments), you cannot have a change of mind and ask for your money back. The traders believe that since the money you paid have mixed up with others, any refund would lead to the downfall of their business. --Assumpta
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  • In Eastern Nigeria, don't be embarrassed when you come to the market anyday and find no one. A whole market can shut down because of the death of a trader. It's our cultural way of commiserating with the deceased family. --Assumpta
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  • In Igbo ethnic group of Nigeria, a woman is not allowed to eat the chicken part: gizzard. The gizzard is reserved specially for the men. It is believed that when a woman eats gizzard, she would have a controlling power over her husband. --Assumpta
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  • In Yoruba ethnic group of Nigeria, an older sibling is not allowed to see the corpse of a younger sibling. It is believed that doing so, the older sibling would die a few days later as well. It is a serious taboo to see the corpse of your younger sibling when they die. --Assumpta
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  • In Igbo ethnic group of Nigeria, we have four market days: Eke, Orie, Afor, Nkwo. You cannot pay a woman's dowry on Orie market day. You must do so on any of the other 3 market days. It is believed that paying dowries on Orie day would make the woman barren (not bear children) in the marriage. --Assumpta
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  • In Lagos Nigeria, when you board commercial buses and you get to your bus stop, don't expect the driver to completely park the vehicle for you to alight. You may likely find yourself in the next bus stop. Lagos drivers are so impatient to park properly, so we normally jump down once they slow down. --Assumpta
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  • In Eastern Nigeria (Igbo), when a couple weeks divorce, after court hearings and court grants divorce, the marriage still holds if the dowry paid on the woman's head have not been returned to the husband's family. Only the return of the dowry signifies end of marriage not court orders. --Assumpta
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  • In Igbo ethnic group of Nigeria, if your plantain tree gives rise to two plantain fingers joined together, it's a sign of bad omen and the joined plantain should be separated with hands at the back and not in front, otherwise the owner of the plantain would give birth to conjoined twins. --Assumpta
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  • In Nigeria (mostly Southern and Western Nigeria), a newborn is only given a name after 8days of birth. It is believed that it is only right to name the child after 8 days because the child has shown tendency for survival (having lived for 8days) and should be provided a name at that time. --Assumpta
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  • When you visit a home in Igbo land (South Eastern Nigeria) and they offer you kola nut, it means that your presence is welcomed in their home and you're expected to accept the gift in return to show you also welcomed their hospitality. --Assumpta
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  • In Igbo land (South Eastern Nigeria), coconut is one of the compulsory items that must be used to marry a woman. Presence of coconut as part of the marriage listed items signifies that the marriage would be fruitful and would last long. --Assumpta
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  • When you board commercial buses in Nigeria, don't be embarrassed when the bus conductor say "enter with your change oo". He's simply asking you to have the exact money for your bus fare as he doesn't have lesser amount or coins to give you as balance. --Assumpta
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  • In Nigeria, don't hug a girl or a woman who is not your sister or wife in public, it would be interpreted as though you're flirting with her. --Assumpta
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  • In Yoruba part of Nigeria, when you want to address an elder in Yoruba language, you must put the prefix 'e' to any word you're saying. For example, if you want to tell your mate or younger one to sit down in Yoruba, you say 'joko', but for an elder, you say 'e joko'. Putting 'e' signifies respect. --Assumpta
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  • In Nigeria, a child should stand up from a seat for an adult to sit. An adult can't be standing while a child sits. It's against our culture. --Assumpta
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  • When you board commercial buses in Nigeria, don't be embarrassed when the bus conductor say "enter with your change oo". He's simply asking you to have the exact bus fare for your payment, as he doesn't have lesser coins to give you as balance. --Assumpta
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Top contributor: Assumpta (27 entries)

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