Armenia

Top 10 Things

  • What NOT to do
  • What to do
  • When participating in toasts, it's customary to keep your arms at your sides or hold your glass with one hand. Crossing your arms during a toast is considered impolite. --Arman
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  • Armenian culture places importance on hierarchy and showing respect to elders and higher-ranking individuals. Use appropriate titles and show deference to senior members during meetings or social interactions. --Anna
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  • Armenians tend to be more indirect in their communication style. Being overly assertive or aggressive in negotiations might be off-putting and harm the business relationship. --Levon
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  • Don't ignore the importance of family connections: Family ties hold significant importance in Armenian society, and many business decisions are influenced by family relationships. Understanding these connections can help you navigate the business landscape better. --Levon
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  • Don't underestimate the importance of gift-giving: Giving and receiving gifts is a common practice in Armenian business culture. When attending meetings or events, consider bringing a thoughtful gift that reflects your home country's culture. --Levon
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  • Armenian culture places value on food, and wasting it is considered disrespectful. Try to take only what you can finish and avoid leaving large amounts of food on your plate. --Anna
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  • Don't forget to greet in Armenian: When meeting someone for the first time or entering a shop or establishment, it's polite to greet the person in Armenian. A simple "Barev (hello)" or "Bari galust (welcome)" can go a long way in showing respect for the local language and culture. --Levon
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  • When sitting on the floor or at a low table, avoid pointing the soles of your feet directly at others. This gesture is considered rude in Armenian culture. --Arman
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  • Don't use informal language with strangers or elders: In Armenian, there are formal and informal ways of addressing others. Use the formal form ("դուք" - "duk") when speaking with strangers or elders as a sign of respect. The informal form ("դու" - "du") is typically reserved for close friends and f --Levon
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  • It is considered rude to refuse food when it is offered to you in Armenia. If you are not hungry, simply take a small portion and eat it later. --Arman
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  • Do not be surprised to hear Armenians using the French word "merci" when saying thank you ... the other option is to go local and say "shnorrhakalutsjun". --Gaz
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  • Pedestrians are supposed to have the right of way, but do not count on it. Armenian drivers can be aggressive when zipping through intersections. Double check before crossing the street! --Gaz
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  • Tipping is appreciated in restaurants and cafes. It's customary to leave a small tip (around 10%) for good service. --Arman
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Top contributor: Levon (7 entries)

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